Death Valley National Park vs Grand Teton National Park

Feel Free To Share:

Death Valley National Park vs Grand Teton National Park

“Embark on a journey of breathtaking beauty and explore two of the most awe-inspiring national parks in America: Death Valley and Grand Teton. While both parks boast unique landscapes, they couldn’t be more different from each other. On one hand, you have the scorching hot and dry desert of Death Valley, where temperatures can reach an astonishing 134°F and the landscape is dotted with salty flats, sand dunes, and canyons. On the other hand, you have the stunning mountain vistas of Grand Teton, with its snow-capped peaks, glistening lakes, and lush forests. Both parks offer a chance to escape from the hustle and bustle of modern life and immerse yourself in the natural world. So, pack your bags and get ready to choose your adventure – will it be the scorching heat of Death Valley or the crisp mountain air of Grand Teton?”

Hiking Trails in Death Valley National Park and Grand Teton National Park

Death Valley National Park and Grand Teton National Park are two of the most popular national parks in the United States. Both offer beautiful landscapes and immense natural beauty. However, they differ significantly in terms of their hiking trails.

Death Valley is known for its challenging hikes, including the grueling Badwater Basin trek, which takes you to the lowest point in North America, and the strenuous Panamint Dunes hike, which takes you to the top of a towering dune field. On the other hand, Grand Teton National Park offers easier hikes, such as the Taggart Lake trail, which takes you to a serene alpine lake surrounded by towering peaks. The park also features challenging hikes, like the Paintbrush Canyon trail, which takes you to the top of the Teton Range and offers panoramic views of the entire park.

In conclusion, both Death Valley and Grand Teton National Parks offer a variety of hiking trails for every level of hiker. Whether you’re looking for a leisurely stroll or a challenging adventure, you can find it in either park.

Most Popular Hiking Trails in Death Valley National Park

Name Length Elevation Type Difficulty Visitor Ratings
Badwater Basin Salt Flats Trail 1.80 mi 9.84 ft out and back Easy 4.5/5
Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes Trail 2.79 mi 206.64 ft out and back Easy 4.5/5
Zabriskie Point 0.40 mi 52.48 ft out and back Easy 4.5/5
Dante’s View Trail 1.60 mi 360.80 ft out and back Easy 4.5/5
Telescope Peak Trail 11.97 mi 3,322.64 ft out and back Hard 4.5/5
Golden Canyon Trail to Red Cathedral 2.89 mi 574.00 ft out and back Moderate 4.5/5
Golden Canyon and Gower Gulch Loop via Zabriskie Point 5.79 mi 1,092.24 ft loop Moderate 4.5/5
Mosaic Canyon Trail 3.49 mi 1,066.00 ft out and back Easy 4/5
Death Valley Natural Bridge Road 4.29 mi 1,000.40 ft out and back Easy 4/5
Darwin Falls Trail via Old Toll Road 1.90 mi 226.32 ft out and back Easy 4/5

Most Popular Hiking Trails in Grand Teton National Park

Name Length Elevation Type Difficulty Visitor Ratings
Cascade Canyon Trail 9.68 mi 1,128.32 ft out and back Moderate 5/5
Jenny Lake Trail 7.68 mi 728.16 ft loop Moderate 4.5/5
Taggart Lake Loop 4.09 mi 429.68 ft loop Easy 4.5/5
Delta Lake via Amphitheater Lake Trail 8.98 mi 2,328.80 ft out and back Hard 5/5
Surprise and Amphitheater Lakes Trail 8.88 mi 2,942.16 ft out and back Very Hard 5/5
Hidden Falls Trail 4.89 mi 590.40 ft loop Easy 4.5/5
Phelps Lake Trail 6.98 mi 724.88 ft loop Moderate 4.5/5
Lake Solitude Trail 15.97 mi 2,637.12 ft out and back Hard 5/5
String Lake Trail 3.69 mi 262.40 ft loop Easy 4.5/5
Taggart Lake and Bradley Lake Loop 5.99 mi 760.96 ft loop Moderate 4.5/5

Wildlife in Death Valley National Park and Grand Teton National Park

Death Valley NP is known for its unique desert wildlife, including the desert bighorn sheep, kit fox, and various species of reptiles such as the sidewinder rattlesnake. Grand Teton NP is home to a diverse array of animals, including the gray wolf, moose, elk, and pronghorn antelope. Both parks have a variety of bird species, such as golden eagles, hawks, and sandpipers, but Grand Teton also has a large population of trumpeter swans and other waterfowl. In terms of plant life, Death Valley boasts spectacular wildflower displays in the spring, while Grand Teton has a mix of conifer forests and alpine meadows with wildflowers.

Below are lists of the most commonly spotted wildlife at Death Valley National Park and Grand Teton National Park. However, you can see a full list of wildlife at each national park here.

Birds

Death Valley National Park Grand Teton National Park
Peregrine Falcon Peregrine Falcon
Northern Harrier Northern Harrier
Sharp-Shinned Hawk Sharp-Shinned Hawk
Osprey Osprey
Tree Swallow Tree Swallow
Mallard Mallard
Canada Goose Canada Goose
Lincoln’s Sparrow Lincoln’s Sparrow
Ruby-Crowned Kinglet Ruby-Crowned Kinglet
American Robin American Robin
Great Horned Owl Great Horned Owl
Red-Tailed Hawk Red-Tailed Hawk
Northern Flicker Northern Flicker
Merlin Merlin
Barn Swallow Barn Swallow
Savannah Sparrow Savannah Sparrow
Great Blue Heron Great Blue Heron
Hermit Thrush Hermit Thrush
American Kestrel American Kestrel
Bald Eagle Bald Eagle
Song Sparrow Song Sparrow
European Starling European Starling
Northern Pintail Northern Pintail
American Wigeon American Wigeon
Green-Winged Teal Green-Winged Teal

Mammals

Death Valley National Park Grand Teton National Park
Coyote Coyote
Muskrat American Beaver
Big Brown Bat Muskrat
Bobcat Big Brown Bat
Little Brown Bat Bobcat
Deer Mouse Striped Skunk
Raccoon Little Brown Bat
Porcupine Deer Mouse
Silver-Haired Bat Raccoon
Hoary Bat Black Bear
House Mouse Porcupine
Mountain Lion Silver-Haired Bat
Mule Deer Hoary Bat
Gray Fox Red Fox
Long-Legged Myotis Long-Tailed Weasel
Long-Eared Myotis Mountain Lion
Badger Mink
Californian Myotis Mule Deer
Fringed Myotis Wolf
Common Shrew Long-Legged Myotis
Mexican Free-Tailed Bat Long-Eared Myotis
Townsend’s Big-Eared Bat Badger
Bushy-Tailed Woodrat Ermine
Western Harvest Mouse California Myotis
Western Small-Footed Myotis Snowshoe Hare

Reptiles

Death Valley National Park Grand Teton National Park
Gopher Snake Gopher Snake
Terrestrial Gartersnake Rubber Boa
Ring-Necked Snake
Common Sagebrush Lizard
Common Side-Blotched Lizard
Rubber Boa
Long-Nosed Leopard Lizard
Smith������S Black-Headed Snake
Tree Lizard
Eastern Fence Lizard
Glossy Snake
Long-Nosed Snake
Western Fence Lizard

Fish

Death Valley National Park Grand Teton National Park
Largemouth Bass Redband Trout
Mosquitofish Brook Trout
Goldfish Brown Trout
Lake Trout
Mottled Sculpin
Longnose Dace
Speckled Dace
Arctic Grayling

Amphibians

Death Valley National Park Grand Teton National Park
Woodhouse’s Toad Northern Leopard Frog
Canyon Treefrog

Beautiful Landscapes in Death Valley National Park and Grand Teton National Park

Death Valley is famous for its vast desert landscapes, including Badwater Basin, the lowest point in North America, and towering peaks of the Panamint Range. It also boasts sand dunes, salt flats, and colorful canyons.

Grand Teton is known for its Teton Mountain Range, its highest peak Grand Teton, Snake River, and Jackson Lake. Visitors can enjoy overlooks such as Jackson Hole and Signal Mountain, and the park’s glacial valleys, alpine lakes, and waterfalls.

Things To-Do and Activities in Death Valley National Park and Grand Teton National Park

Death Valley and Grand Teton national parks offer diverse recreational activities. Death Valley highlights include scenic drives to view unique geological features like Badwater Basin and sand dunes at Stovepipe Wells, ranger-led tours and camping. Grand Teton is known for its picturesque mountain views, wildlife viewing opportunities like bird watching and recreational activities like scenic drives, boating and fishing. Both parks offer a variety of outdoor experiences, but each is unique in its own way, attracting different types of visitors.

Best Time to Visit Death Valley National Park and Grand Teton National Park

Death Valley NP & Grand Teton NP have distinct weather patterns. Death Valley is the hottest, driest & lowest NP in N. America with summer temp often over 120°F & mild winter temps. Grand Teton NP, located in the Rockies, has harsh, cold winters with heavy snow & mild summers.

The best time to visit Death Valley is winter (mild temps, less rain) & spring (wildflowers). Summer is very hot. Grand Teton NP is best visited in summer (mild, accessible for activities) & winter (good for skiing, limited access).

Family Friendliness of Death Valley National Park and Grand Teton National Park

Death Valley National Park and Grand Teton National Park offer different experiences for families. Death Valley is known for its vast desert landscapes and unique geological formations, while Grand Teton is famous for its towering mountain peaks and abundant wildlife. While both parks have facilities for camping, picnicking and hiking, Grand Teton may be more family-friendly, offering diverse recreational activities such as fishing, boating and horseback riding, and more developed campgrounds and a variety of accommodations, including lodges and cabins.

Leave a Comment